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A Forth Term, and a Last Hurrah

On 20 January 1945 Franklin D. Roosevelt was sworn in for the fourth time as President of the United States.  Though he was weak and tired and he had lost a great deal of his edge, it seemed as if he would be president forever.

He had less than three months to live.

The global conflict for which he is so closely associated was reaching its bloody end in Europe and the Pacific.  The Germans had expended the last of their mobile reserves in the Ardennes; the Japanese had taken to crashing airplanes into ships.  Yet, American factories kept grinding out the weapons of war, Britain and Russia eyed each other warily over the future of Europe, and in the New Mexico desert a handful of scientists had finally figured out how to make a series of explosive implosions that just might trigger an atomic bomb.

The conflict was ending, sooner or later, so what would peace look like?  Would war crimes trials cause enough lingering resentment to derail any chance of a lasting peace?  Would the nascent United Nations have enough power to prevent this global catastrophe from happening again?  Would this new “television” threaten radio’s hold on popular entertainment?  Would the Cubs do it this year?

So many questions greeted the new year and the new administration, but wiser heads already knew the answer to the question that no one dared ask: Who would be the next president, and when?  Harry S Truman, the investigating senator from Missouri, had been chosen in 1944 to be the next vice-president, and almost anyone in FDR’s inner circle knew, watching him give his last inaugural address–his first from his chair for he was too weak to stand–that he would not last another summer, even if he lasted out the spring.

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Strategic Bombardment: In The Beginning (1915)

The means were crude: enormous gas bags with diesel engines pushing against the wind.  Their targets weren’t factories, or docks or barracks or railway stations, but buildings in towns.  On the night of 19-20 January 1915, the first German Zeppelin raids hit Norfolk at King’s Lynn, Great Yarmouth and Sheringham.  The bomb loads were tiny in comparison to what would follow.  By 1917 Germany gave up on bombing England.

In the period between WWI and WWII, Germany, Britain and the US took two different views of those early raids.  The Germans looked at the targets the Allies hit (mostly in 1918) and saw failure; the British and Americans looked at the results of the Zeppelin raids and saw success.  They would design their air forces accordingly.

Crop Duster: A Novel of WWII is a fictionalized story about American and German fliers and the air forces that they flew for.  Available at booksellers everywhere in paperback and e-book.

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The Best Book Nobody’s Buying but Everybody’s Reading

JDB Communications’s latest book, Crop Duster: A Novel of World War Two, has received rave reviews from everyone who’s read it, but apparently no one’s buying it.  Even more baffling, Amazon shows more “used” copies for sale than have actually been sold over the counter…some as far afield as Great Britain.

Mighty good trick for a print-on-demand book that has only had a few domestic sales.

But enough whining.  This blog is intended to entice you, my good readers, to buy JDBCOM books and articles.  Today, we talk about Crop Duster, JDBCOM’s first foray into book-length fiction.

If what interests you is action, suspense, romance, drama, light comedy and a page-turning read, then Crop Duster is for you.  Imagine B-17s and FW-190s mixing it up high over Germany amid murderous flak, deadly cold, and screaming metal.  See in your mind’s eye a firestorm rising over Hamburg, a crippled JU-88 wafting through the fog onto an English field; a fuel-starved Fortress with no rados pounding through an Atlantic storm with a beautiful VIP aboard.

Yes, you’ll find all of that and more in Crop Duster.  Available in paperback and E-book wherever fine books are sold.